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Pop Culture Affidavit Episode 71: The Legend of Wonder Woman

episode-71-website-coverFor the past 75 years, she’s been a hero and role model, and this summer she is getting her own feature film.  I’m talking, of course, about Wonder Woman.  To honor the mighty Amazon, I’m taking a look at two series entitled The Legend of Wonder Woman.  The first, from 1986, is by Kurt Busiek and Trina Robbins and takes place right after Crisis on Infinite Earths, closing the door on the pre-Crisis incarnation of Diana while opening the door for the landmark George Perez run.  The second, from 2016, is by Renae De Liz and Ray Dillon, and is an all-ages, out-of-continuity retelling of WW’s origin story.

iTunes:  Pop Culture Affidavit

Direct Download

Pop Culture Affidavit podcast page

As a bonus, here are scans of the text pieces from the 1986 Legend of Wonder Woman series.

By Kurt Busiek (from issue #1):

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By Trina Robbins (from issue #2):

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In Country: Marvel Comics’ “The ‘Nam” — Episode 76

ic-76-website-coverFrank Castle is back in the second “Punisher in ‘The ‘Nam'” storyline!  This time around, I take a look at The ‘Nam #67, the first of a three-parter starring the Marvel vigilante who was so popular in the early 1990s that he got a book about his weapons.  But at this point, he’s not The Punisher yet, although he does … punish. It’s brought to you by Chuck Dixon, Kevin Kobasic, and Jimmy Palmiotti.  In addition to the issue, I’ll also be covering the historical context for the summer of 1971.

You can download the episode via iTunes or listen directly at the Two True Freaks website

In Country iTunes feed

In Country Episode 76 direct link

As an added bonus, here is a scan of my copy of The ‘Nam #67, which is signed by Jimmy Palmiotti (the signature, which isn’t the clearest, is by Frank’s leg).

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ORIGIN STORY EPISODE FIVE

origin-story-episode-5-website-coverShockwave tries to destroy the world! It’s time for another look at G.I. Joe and the Transformers and this time around, I’m looking at issue #3 of the series, which raises the stakes as Cobra has to ally with G.I. Joe and the Autobots. I also share some memories of Christmas 1986.

Please don’t forget to leave feedback at the Pop Culture Affidavit Facebook page and check out Pop Culture Affidavit for the show notes.

 

iTunes:  Pop Culture Affidavit

Direct Download

Pop Culture Affidavit podcast page

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Origin Story Episode Three

origin-story-episode-3-website-coverThirty years ago, I begn collecting comics for the first time. Now, I’m taking you back to those days with “Origin Story,” a comics podcasting miniseries where I will look at all of the comics I bought in 1986-1987 in “real time.”

This time, I step away from Marvel and head over to DC for The Adventures of Superman #424, which marks the beginning of that title in the post-Crisis era.  Does it still hold up after 30 years?  Will I be able to say anything that Michael Bailey and Jeffrey Taylor haven’t already said?  Will I fill out the postcard in the middle of the comic and attempt to win a copy of the Man of Steel special edition hardcover 30 years after the contest expired?  Well, you’ll just have to listen!

Please don’t forget to leave feedback at the Pop Culture Affidavit Facebook page and check out Pop Culture Affidavit for the show notes.

iTunes:  Pop Culture Affidavit

Direct Download

Pop Culture Affidavit podcast page

Here are a couple of extras:

The iconic cover of the comic:

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And the trailer for the Stallone movie Cobra:

Pop Culture Affidavit Episode 65: Cherry-Flavored Pez

Episode 65 Website CoverThirty years ago, Rob Reiner directed the seminal coming-of-age film Stand By Me. To celebrate its anniversary, Michael Bailey and I take a look at the film as well as the Stephen King novella “The Body,” upon which it’s based; as well as the music on its soundtrack. We also discuss why it’s an essential movie for anyone who grew up in the 1980s.

iTunes:  Pop Culture Affidavit

Direct Download

Pop Culture Affidavit podcast page

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After the cut are are some of the clips featured in the episode:

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Comics Prehistory: Superman #410

Superman 410As I make my way through these very early days of buying comics, I see more and more how my purchases were influenced by other media.  The two issues of Transformers that I just looked at are prime examples.  Superheroes are another, as much of my early knowledge of the spandex set came from seeing them on television shows such as Super-Friends or Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends.  Another source was, occasionally, my dad, who liked Superman and was a fan of the Christopher Reeve films (at least Superman and Superman II).  That, of course, led to my purchasing all four issues of Superman: The Secret Years, and it led to my buying Superman #410.

This was another trip to Amazing Comics, sometime around my birthday in 1985 because while this issue came out that May, I remember seeing this and Superman #411 on the shelves at the same time, so it must have been right before Bob took the comic off of the main shelves and put it on the spinner rack near the door, which is what he did for all of “last month’s comics.”  It was a practice that he held onto for years and while I do have fond memories of comic book spinner racks and would love to own one someday, they do have an odd associate in my mind with comic book leftovers.

Okay, tangent over–or at least point of tangent, which is that my dad took me to the local comic store and said that he thought the cover to Superman #410 looked cool, so I decided to buy it.  Drawn by Klaus Janson, who at that point was known for his work with Frank Miller, the cover is certainly a dramatic one–Clark Kent is walking away from a screen where Superman is saying “I categorically deny the story Clark Kent wrote about in the Daily Planet–it is nothing but a pack of lies!”  If I may criticize it briefly, I will say that Superman does have a bit of a fat face and Clark’s suit looks two sizes too big, but the drama of Superman’s pronouncement and then the cover of the paper saying “CLARK KENT FIRED” was enough to pull me in and still makes me want to read the issue.

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Superman saves a satellite.  Or does he?

What’s inside is the first of a really great three-part story arc that is one of those excellent late Bronze Age/pre-Crisis Superman stories.  We open with Superman saving a nuclear-powered satellite from falling to earth and blowing up, and then cut to Clark writing about it for the paper.  But the thing is, that satellite resuce never actually happened and once that is discovered, Superman finds himself being forced to deny the story, which gets Clark fired.  Superman, of course, is confused because he knows what he saw and knows what he did, yet when he flies to the place where the satellite fell from orbit, it’s still there.

Is he going nuts?  No.  This is all the machinations of Lex Luthor, who is messing with Superman’s mind from the confines of his lair, and he will just copntinue to do so until the end of issue #413, where he gets away because Brainiac recruits him to join a team of villains in Crisis on Infinite Earths #6 (Superman #413, by the way, is an issue I bought years later because it was an unofficial Crisis crossover).

It is, essentially, everything I wanted a Superman story to be when I was a kid, and exactly what i expect out of this time in the Man of Steel’s career.  Lex has an underground lair with henchmen and is planning supervillainy?  Check.  There’s romantic subplots with Lana and Lois?  Check.  Clark is secondary to Superman?  Check.  Granted, I would come to really love the FCTC-era Superman and I do consider that version to be my favorite iteration of the characters, but the “Oh, this would only happen on pre-Crisis Earth-1” feel of this particular issue is part of its charm.  Plus, it’s just a great setup and doesn’t feel like Cary Bates or Julius Schwartz were burning off stories prior to Alan Moore and then John Byrne.

Even the Curt Swan artwork, which I will admit I am hot and cold on at times, works well here.  Swan is inked by Al Williamson, whom I am most familiar with from Star Wars comics of the era, and his links, though pretty loose at times(although this may be due to the reproduction on the digital comic, which makes some of these old newsprint comics look like they are on baxter paper and it doesn’t always work), give Swan’s artwork more grace and fluidity than I’m used to seeing.  Then again, I’m not the most accurate judge of Swan’s art, considering I don’t have a lot of issues he actually drew.

But honestly, this is one of thosecomics that makes me with I had started collecting earlier than 1987, and that i had been experiencing the ed of the Bronze Age and the beginning of the Modern Age as it happened.  This was still a time when a little kid could pick up books and follow them even if he had little to no sense of continuity.  Although even a sense of continuity could not have helped my next book.

Next up:  Secret Wars II #6

Up, Up, and Away!

While I was preparing my latest installment of “Comics Prehistory,” I realized that my next installment, “Superman: The Secret Years” was a series I wrote about way back in the early days of this blog. In fact, I wrote this entry back on April 17, 2010, a little more than SIX YEARS AGO.

So, enjoy this flashback re-post and I’ll be back in a week or two with the next Comics Prehistory book, Transformers #5.

Pop Culture Affidavit

I honestly don’t remember when I bought my first comic book or what that comic was.  I have vague memories of perusing the magazine rack at Greaves stationary in my hometown and coming home with an issue of The Amazing Spider-Man or Superman.  At some point, I know that I got an issue of the Batman team-up title The Brave and the Bold sometime in the very early 1980s, so that might have been it.  But Superman: The Secret Years #2 was the very first comic book that I remember buying at an actual comic book store.

Amazing Comics, which is on Gillette Avenue in Sayville, NY, opened in the fall of 1984 next to an iron-on T-shirt store named The Special-T, which is where my friends and I procured most of our wardrobe.  I am sure that I was at the Special-T buying a birthday present for…

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